Preparing for Surgery

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So you have your surgery date booked, you’re happy with your surgeon.  Now its time to do your own preparation. Being ready, healthy and prepared is the best way to go into any surgery, it helps reduce anxieties, stress and improve overall mental attitude.  Here are some tips of things I’m currently doing to prepare ;

1. Do your homework

Those who feel the most informed and most prepared are the ones that approach surgery day with confidence. Do not research to the point of raising your anxieties, everyone knows most people post horror stories. But try and Inform yourself with positive stories, as a reminder that you are on the right track. Reach out to others on Instagram and surgery forums (http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php) Is a good one. This will help you gain as much practical information as possible.  These people have been there, they know how you feel and not only will they give you useful tips and insight, but they will give you that reassurance everything will be fine.

2. Appointments 

Before your operation date, being organised is the key in avoiding any other unnecessary hurdles that could be avoided after surgery. Any bank, doctors, dentist, eye appointments you have due, or have been avoiding, get them booked in and done. Also any medication you need whilst you are off, ask your doctor for, or sign up and register for repeat prescriptions on https://pharmacyoutlet.co.uk

 3. Get Organised

I am a list freak. I write lists for work, for shopping, for everything . Not only does it help me stay organised, but it gets my messy thoughts out of my head and onto paper. Its a great way to offload.  Making a list of things you need to do before surgery is key. It will keep your anxieties at bay and things will run a lot smoother.  I am currently writing a list  of healthy meal plans I will be buying before the surgery that i can prep before hand. ( as I sit here eating mince pies ) 

4. Entertainment.

If like me your surgery is going to make you a couch potato for some time, your going to need some good entertainment. Books, Box sets, puzzles, crosswords, podcasts, music, what ever your idea of entertainment is, get it bought/downloaded before hand.  Personally signing up to Netflix will be my source of entertainment. That TV series you’ve not had time to get round to watch. Now is the time. Iv been told i must watch Game of Thrones, along with ‘Pretty little liars’ and Suits, so they are on the list.

Pre-order any books you’ve been dying to read.  Personally I have ordered a couple of light heartened books; Sophie Kinsella and Marian Keys are great for this, they provide some light escapism, keeping my thoughts light and positive is key for me.

 5. Support Network

Having a support network of people around you is something I feel grateful to have, having these  key people around after a surgery or any kind of recovery is so helpful.  Making sure you talk through with someone what you will need, e.g a drive home from hospital, help with every day tasks, walking the dog . Asking for help can be difficult, Iv always felt this ingrained feeling that I dont want to burden people with my stuff ,or bother people.  But my job and other experiences has made me realise how much we need one another. So don’t be afraid to ask. Talk through any worries you may be having with a friend, family member or parent. If you are feeling very anxious, having people to talk to can reduce those fears. 

If you do not have a support network around for what ever reasons, tell your surgeon this, they can arrange some home care for the practical side of things and also refer to point 1 above. Its amazing how supportive strangers who have been through the same thing, will support you in an emotional way.

6. Get packing 
 Pack a bag.  My bag currently consists of a good book, pack something to keep you occupied before or after the procedure.
Any medications you are on or may need should you be staying in hospital, take them anyway even if this is unplanned.
Small bag of personal toiletry items if your surgery will require an overnight stay (don’t forget to bring glasses or contact lenses )
Lose fitting comfortable clothes for coming home in.
 Now i’m off to enjoy a short walk along Brighton seafront, with a large cappuccino  from my favourite coffee shop.  I’m Making the most of those times, whilst I am able to do so. 
 
 
        7.  Go and enjoy the little things too x

 

Knee Saga

 

A little bit of background.   So Iv had ”funny” knees since I was a child and they began dislocating at 13 a scary, horrible experience, but weirdly one I got used to.  They have dislocated walking down stairs, in a swimming pool, and a night  out with the girls would often end in my painful party trick of me on the floor with a knee that had dislocated.  But I would persevere, ice, rest and carry on with life.

I mainly put off the idea of surgery, due to my driving test, travelling, shopping, washing my hair…. you get my point I  avoided it.   The pain was a factor for this, but not the real reason behind neglecting my knee’s for so long. I was scared of how much it would change my life, my job, my relationship, my social life. Also hearing the recovery was sooo long, I was scared I was going to ‘miss out.’   I was also scared it would leave me worse off.

I Know its just an opp, but I developed a deep rooted anxiety around the issue,  every dislocation left me a little more anxious, I think that’s called a trauma. Youd think it of pushed me toward getting it done, but it made me avoid it more . But that’s anxiety . It makes no sense . I think others going through any physical or mental recoveries can relate to that, not just those TTT rare knee people . 

But things changed. I cant live in constant anxiety that my knee may pop out should I slip in a swimming pool, or walking downstairs or I move to quickly, any longer.  So I am booked in for a TTT/TTO surgery ( Tibial Tubercle Transfer).   Basically, you know the bump below your knee (tibial tubercle) they move that, by breaking that off your tibia with the patellar tendon attached and move it to a more ‘appropriate’ place.

   I have found a few people online who have had this surgery which is great as its a rare knee surgery, so it would be great to speak more to you. 

But no matter your surgery/Recovery I think its great to share stories to support and help one another on the bumpy road x  

Facing Fears

So here I am, writing a blog. Iv always felt a bit unsure about blogs, like the world has gone mad, everyone wants to paint a picture of their ‘perfect life’ that’s not so perfect in reality. Everyone’s an expert. Sally went to spain for two weeks and now has a travel blog.  Barry did an online course for £40 and is now a nutritional bone structure advisor . ( Could be a thing ) But  I then came across a blog that changed how I felt. 

See iv been putting off a major surgery for over 7 years now, my partner so much as spoke to me about my dislocating knee, I would feel a surge of panic and shut the conversation down.  As a born worrier, being told I needed my leg broken (both) and realigned was something I was waaaay to anxious to ever face.

But these past couple of years things changed, I faced fears in my personal life and work life so out of  my comfort zone, that my anxieties have decreased, therefore my happiness has increased.  And this lead me on to finally research the surgery more, which brought me to this inspiring blog.   It gave me the insight, the courage and the push to finally book surgery.

So if a blog can help me feel positive about a subject I avoided for so long and make a difference, just by reading about someone else I can relate to, then to be able to help others in the same way is worth becoming a ‘blogger’.

I was once told it feels better to move towards a problem , than it does away from it….

They were right.  x